Simply the Best! – the top ranked unbeaten school rugby teams 2007-2016 (10 seasons)

Apologies if I don’t have this one entirely correct.

Here’s the table of the 9 unbeaten table topping schoolboy rugby teams over the last 10 seasons followed by an experimental poll where our bloggers get to have their say.

# School Year P W D L PF PA PD PD/Game
1 Grey College 2007 15 15 0 0 828 141 687 45.8
2 Grey College 2008 15 15 0 0 624 168 456 30.4
3 Paarl Gim 2008 22 22 0 0 863 224 639 29
4 Grey College 2010 17 17 0 0 714 186 528 31.1
5 Grey College 2011 19 17 2 0 752 216 536 28.2
6 Affies 2013 14 14 0 0 581 191 390 27.9
7 Paarl Gim 2013 22 21 1 0 819 231 588 26.7
8 HJS Paarl 2015 19 19 0 0 556 225 331 17.4
9 HJS Paarl 2016 18 18 0 0 652 238 414 23

[yop_poll id=”7″]

unbeaten-teams-2007-2016-v2

 


390 Comments

  1. This is a very tough one.

    Unbelievable how many of these players don’t play rugby anymore

    And only 5 Springboks and a lot of them struggling to be first choice at their unions

    ReplyReply
  2. Except for the 2007 squad almost no forwards making it at senior level. Past 2 years onbviously excluded. Do forward players burn themselves out at SBR? I cannot rate any team as I do not know the players. If Boishaai is unbeaten next year they will get my vote but I doubt it.

    ReplyReply
  3. @Hooit: If you look at the bottom row of teams I think that stat might switch around. A few forwards who look likely to leave an imprint at senior level one day but not too many backs who inspire confidence of achieving household name status down the line.

    ReplyReply
  4. Gim was in 2008 in ons 150ste bestaansjaar ook onoorwonne, maar weet nie of ons die nr1 posisie gedeel het met Grey nie? If not, how is it possible that it was shared with Affies in 2013?

    Completely biased but that was definitely the best schoolboy side I’ve ever seen.

    ReplyReply
  5. @Gimoldboy: The rankings are subjective. There was a healthy debate over who should have been no.1 back in 2013. Not all websites ranked Gim at one. In 2008 there was basically only one ranking – I think.

    In 2015 unbeaten Michaelhouse finished in the Top 10 but did not beat any of the known powerhouses.

    ReplyReply
  6. @beet: I will contact Helmut Lehman, who was apart of that team and currently works at the school and send it to you ASAP.

    Thanks for clearing it up!

    ReplyReply
  7. A points difference of almost 46 points a game puts the 2007 GCB side in a different league to the other teams mentioned here.

    ReplyReply
  8. Grey Results 2007

    Grey College 57, Duineveld 6
    Grey College 66, Marais Viljoen 0
    Grey College 21, Durban High 6
    Grey College 52, Dan Pienaar 7
    Grey College 50, Jim Fouché 6
    Grey College 66, Harmony Sportacademy 10
    Grey College 64, Sentraal 9
    Grey College 86, Maritzburg College 3
    Grey College 68, Selborne College 0
    Grey College 48, Paarl Boys’ High 24
    Grey College 47, Affies 10
    Grey College 44, Grey Boys’ High School 26
    Grey College 38, Pretoria Boys’ High 20
    Grey College 81, Glenwood 0
    Grey College 40, Paul Roos 14

    ReplyReply
  9. Grey 2008;

    Grey College 41, Harmony Sportacademy 12
    Grey College 22, Noord-Kaap 11
    Grey College 45, Linden High 6
    Grey College 41, Windhoek High 0
    Grey College 16, Monument 14
    Grey College 61, Jim Fouché 10
    Grey College 50, Sentraal 0
    Grey College 72, Maritzburg College 7
    Grey College 34, Paarl Boys’ High 24
    Grey College 31, Affies 12
    Grey College 38, Selborne College 16
    Grey College 22, Grey Boys’ High School 17
    Grey College 82, Pretoria Boys’ High 10
    Grey College 22, Glenwood 14
    Grey College 47, Paul Roos Gimnasium 15

    ReplyReply
  10. Paarl Gim 2008

    GIM 2008 F A
    1 Tygerberg RFC 78 0
    2 Noord-Kaap 26 0
    3 Pretoria BH 32 3
    4 St Alban’s 52 5
    5 Buenos Aires 35 12
    6 Rosario 16 13
    7 Panara 47 17
    8 Rondebosch 35 12
    9 Affies 21 3
    10 Oakdale 33 22
    11 Paul Roos 17 14
    12 Boland Landbou 17 0
    13 Outeniqua 37 21
    14 Drostdy 81 22
    15 SACS 57 5
    16 De Kuilen 89 0
    17 Wynberg 35 30
    18 Bishops 21 10
    19 HJS Paarl BH 35 8
    20 Tygerberg 34 8
    21 Hugenote 47 3
    22 Outeniqua 18 16
        863 224
    ReplyReply
  11. Also, Gim beat HJS 35-8 in the Interschools clash that year right after the Bishops game. That was our famous 5th consecutive win.

    ReplyReply
  12. @Hooit:
    The following forwards played provincial in the years (excluding the 5 in 2007):
    2008 Jean Cook, Adriaan Theisinger
    2010 Gerhard Olivier, Henco Venter, Neil Jordaan
    2011 Rudolph Botha, Jacques du Toit, Tienie Burger, Gerhard Olivier, Henco Greyling.

    If we use opposition of the year as criteria, the 2007 Grey team rates tops. Beat all schools comfortably.

    ReplyReply
  13. Wasn’t Goosen in the 2008 side. As 2008 was GW centenary and 2010 GW never played due to Snow in Van Reenen’s Pass

    ReplyReply
  14. The Grey 2011 probably won’t win the vote but in terms of guts and determination to overcome the odds, they were quite a team. Dries Swanepoel was praised as a leader. I think of all 9 teams they must have been the biggest overachievers to go through the entire season unbeaten.

    ReplyReply
  15. @Djou: I know some played but very few made it like Coenie Oosthuizen and Boom from the top row.
    Grey Bloem always struggle against Monnas. Any reason for this. As discussed previously Monnas with more wins than losses against Grey. 2008 team beat Monnas with only 2.

    ReplyReply
  16. @Hooit: I dont think the stats you heard was correct as well…According to what I have Grey and Monnas played each other 16 times with Grey winning 9, Monnas 6 and one draw. Still an impressive record against Grey, but I suspect that these were mostly games played at festivals and not a regular fixture if I look at the gaps in the years.

    Year Grey Monnas
    2015 7 17
    2014 10 10
    2013 13 8
    2012 8 0
    2011 18 14
    2010 26 6
    2008 18 14
    1997 21 7
    1996 8 13
    1995 27 20
    1994 30 36
    1993 12 34
    1992 6 11
    1991 14 16
    1988 34 3
    1985 20 0

    ReplyReply
  17. @Speartackle: Affies en Grey se spelpatrone verskil nie baie van mekaar nie…Altwee het altyd sterk pakke en baie goeie groot agterspelers…Grey speel net dieselde tipe game teen n baie hoer tempo en dan kan Afies nie altyd byhou nie. Jy moet nooit n Grey game teen Grey probeer speel nie. En n span moet speel tot na die eindfluitjie geblaas het…vra maar vir PR..dit het nou al 2 keer in 4 jaar met hulle gebeur dat Grey die game in laaste sekondes wen!

    ReplyReply
  18. @Alan Morrissey: Actually Monnas only started with this 10 man thing in the 2000’s…..they were in fact always known for running rugby.

    I know not a lot of people will believe it but Jorrie Muller was one of the most devastating runners in SBR in his time. Another fact is that Willem Alberts was converted to a forward from flyhalf at u/16 level. We all know Jaque Fourie was a 15 at school and I think only converted to 13 after u/20.

    I had always thought Fourie could have been a brilliant flyhalf in the Stephen Larkham mould. Larkham also wasn’t the best kicker out of hand when he came on the scene but practised it a lot…..Fourie was talented enough to learn that too

    And tomorrow….Alberts is our fetcher….lol

    ReplyReply
  19. @BoishaaiPa: An old Grey told me some years back that they played Monnas as a fixture in the 90s. He’s a youngster that finished at Grey in the mid 2000s though, so there may be some verification that’s needed.

    @Speartackle: @Alan Morrissey: Our pack has 3 locks and 2 no8s….a selection that can only have been made in a ching-chong-chow contest.

    ReplyReply
  20. @Playa: Kwagga should be there even if he is a little light…Marx should start with Whiteley as captain and Rohan in for DDA…

    ReplyReply
  21. @Playa: I think Eddie Jones was very worried until lunch yesterday with all their injuries but after SA team announcement I think he slept like a baby

    ReplyReply
  22. Where’s BOG…..I want to congratulate him on Grey’s 45th Springbok……..Think he is enjoying a Swedish massage with Nelio

    ReplyReply
  23. @Playa: Its going to be interesting. Kwagga should be there??????? Why they going to include him as the World 7’s Series starts soon. JJ should get a chance. As this would be a good test to see if he’s a Loose Forward for next year. Go Bokke.

    ReplyReply
  24. @Speartackle: I’m very happy for Francois Venter. Have been a fan of his for a long time and think his call up was overdue. It seemed like he got a raw deal at the Bulls towards the end of his stay there. Nice bounce back.

    @Alan Morrissey: @Rottweiller: If a genuine openside flank that the Boks were after they should have looked at Paul Schoeman of Free State.

    I’m not sure what sort of form Deon Fourie is in at present and although I didn’t care much for the character he put in some good performances at 6 for Province when required. Very skilled at getting his hands on tackled ball. He’s close by as well. Then again, perhaps not a great idea to reward too many overseas based players if we want domestic players to stay loyal.

    ReplyReply
  25. @Speartackle: best rugby player Monnas has produced – both for his rugby ability and brain – is without doubt Brendan Venter.

    and not even he could beat KES :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

    ReplyReply
  26. @beet: Agree with you on Francois Venter.
    I mean New Zealand saw his talents when he was in grade 10 and wanted to recruit him.
    He is not the spectacular runner who breaks tackles, but he always straightens and creates space, while possessing vision to see space and has good distribution skills. His defence is also solid.
    I just hope he does not lose confidence in this team!

    ReplyReply
  27. @Speartackle: Agreed Velleman technically brilliant and a livewire. I really hope he can enjoy an injury free campaign next year because if nothing else he’s a great example for others in SA. But there is also a ? about his size to consider. Real stats must have CJ at about 1.73m. Once upon a time Neil Back was an extremely effective small flank in a highly successful England team and David Pocock hasn’t done too badly for himself either (especially when 100% fit). Very difficult for CJ to break through to top level tho. SA not fond of small forwards and after the days of Brussow, not really a nation that looks for a super specialist opensider.

    Also thought that altho well decorated as a schoolboy Marnus Schoeman has had his moments over the years without much recognition for the energy his been able to bring to the party.

    ReplyReply
  28. @beet: Yep, according to the experts in SA Rugby, a fetcher is of no importance. Apparently every player needs to do that part, but snot knows, some of them can’t even bend down

    ReplyReply
  29. @Speartackle: True, fetcher needs to be small, quick and a solid built guy. A wrestler (miniature sumari wrestler)of note. He can stand at the back of all lineouts and chase down any 3/4 that handles the ball.

    ReplyReply
  30. @Alan Morrissey: It wasn’t a chirp. I was supporting your bias towards GW. Cooper and who’s that Fly Half that’s with the FS team should start as VC for the Boks. That’s a winners choice.

    ReplyReply
  31. @McCulleys Workshop: Where has he been? I hope his been training hard. Hopefully he won’t get caught with his hands in the RUCK again.
    I wonder what puppy Alan has, it’s name is probably Ivan Clark

    ReplyReply
  32. Selecting a best ever side , I do find very difficult. The strengh, and ability of the various opponents, vary way to much from year to year. I do not know if Beet or BoishaaiPa have the stats, but it would be interesting to see how many of the Top 10, and also Top 20 teams, the respective sides played in their glory year. Obviously, the top ranked teams of that particular season. The venue of these matches will also have an impact on my calculations. This is still also not bullet proof. It is possible that a certain year group is not really all that strong. Therefore, a school with a half decent side, can quite easely finish unbeaten, taken these factors in account.

    ReplyReply
  33. @The Big Easy: Hopper fetcher. That would be interesting. Would have the speed of a Flying Crane and the hands of a T-Rex.

    @McCulleys-Served my punishment, fighting fit and clean. All this rain has washed me clean from my gutter. Without the service delivery the gutters get flooded these days. I can’t stay down for too long. You know what they say”You can’t keep a good man down” Viva SA Viva

    ReplyReply
  34. A simple rule in life which seems to be ignored in SA sport, is the following: “Charisma can elevate you, but only character and ability can keep you there” Congratulations to Francois Venter who becomes GCBs 45th Springbok. With 800 + Springboks so far, it means that they have produced (roughly) 5% of all of SAs Springboks. With a winning record of 90% + over more than a century, HOME AND AWAY, truly a remarkable achievement. Vive le Grey, indeed! I have watched school rugby over many years, and there is simply NO side, in and outside of SA, over several eras, which can compare with the “dream team” of 2007. They may not have produced as many Springboks as other teams, but as school boys, they were simply beyond exceptional.

    ReplyReply
  35. @Roger: Jis that not much advice. I don’t know if Toti High has ever had a HEAD Girl????. Maybe GB knows. He’s a clean, honest, well cut guy.

    ReplyReply
  36. @Roger…take another look at your stat, bear in mind co-ed, number of boys etc. Not so tough now are you!

    ReplyReply
  37. With Kes de Kock scoring a 100 this morning I’m sure Rog is enjoying some head hunting somewhere

    ReplyReply
  38. @Skopgraaf243: doesn’t Monnas have over 2,000 pupils? Half of which are boys? So not as small as one thinks when compared to say Boland Lanbou or Marlow etc

    ReplyReply
  39. @Speartackle: I believe that some Monnas supporters even tried to “erase” the results vs KES from the Monnas honours board in the pavilion – hehehehehe

    and Monnas still won’t correct the ’82 result which is reflected incorrectly on the honours board – in Monnas’ favour – hehehehehehe

    shem ne!

    ReplyReply
  40. @Roger: Are the 2015 and 2016 results up on your board yet?

    You okes seem to be getting more 50’s against than Warner scoring against Proteas

    ReplyReply
  41. @Alan Morrissey: @Speartackle: True. Monnas always played running rugby – this changed in the last 4 or 5 years only!

    Willem played lock (and CW in his matric year), I think he played 3rd team in his Std. 9 year.

    Jaque played the 1st half of his matric season as a 13 and CW 13 but started playing Monnas 15 from the Beeld play-off stages (against Bastion, to be more specific). He played 10 for the 1st team in Std 9. He also played a few games 15 for the Lions senior team whilst at school.

    ReplyReply
  42. @Speartackle: come come ou’ Speartjie – the derby goes back waaay longer than two years – just admit the souties have taught you a few lessons in the past :mrgreen:

    ReplyReply
  43. I wonder what excuse a certain body will spring up for the Aussies now. It would be great if he just said “Well done” to the lads.

    Viva le Proteas!!!! :-D

    7 in a row against the old foe

    ReplyReply
  44. @Playa: it will be something along the lines of ………

    “weakest Aussie team in years, they couldn’t bat their way out of a wet paper bag, me grandmother could make more runs than them …….” yadayadayadayada

    Given that we have smashed them without AB and Steyn and without Amla and Du Plessis firing it is a massive win – KG, Temba, Quinny, Duminy, Big Vern and Elgar to the fore – with Abbot superlative today.

    Makes up for the abysmal Bokke!

    ReplyReply
  45. @Ploegskaar: I bought a few cases of the Springfield Wholeberry online. Thanks for that. Will settle down this this weekend with a glass or two. Watch the Proteas bowl the hell out of the Ozzie batsmen. This time with a pink ball.

    ReplyReply
  46. In your opinions, which school has the toughest month of April 2017?..starting from the North/South tournament , through the Easter Festivals and ending at Wildeklawer on the 1st of May. It seems that some teams have some serious mountains to climb during April month!..

    Selborne has EG, Monnas, Paarl Boys and Helpies in that Month
    Affies has Paarl Boys, Paul Roos and Outeniqua (With Gim in late March)

    What other schools also have 4 toughies in April?

    ReplyReply
  47. @beet: Good idea..If you can compile a list of the schools with toughest list of fixtures for April..we can vote then!..If those schools survive April next year with most of their team intact, the rest of the year will seem like a breeze!

    ReplyReply
  48. @beet: Think I have found the toughest one so far..Paarl Gim!..The end off March against Affies then kick off April with Garsies, EG, Paul Roos, Waterkloof and Grey College!…eish!…

    ReplyReply
  49. Although Boland & Gym seem to have the toughest starts on the surface, both will have about a 3 week break between Noord/Suid & the 1st league game, followed by WK.

    I think a team like EG Jansen, who will play at Noord/Suid, KERF and then WK, within the space of a month, will find the going tougher

    ReplyReply
  50. Well done, Springboks. Came within two of that European giant of rugby, Italy. As I am not in a position where I can influence matters, I assume that I may only pay compliments and not criticize? But what the heck are the ones doing, who claim to be working “behind the scenes”?

    ReplyReply
  51. @Alan Morrissey: I think that they would have to somehow qualify before being admitted to the competition. With their record, you cannot expect Zim and Namibia just to admit them. Perhaps first “prove” themselves vs Lesotho and Swaziland.

    ReplyReply
  52. Met die toekoms van SA rugby in die algemeen, en Springbokrugby spesifiek, wonder ek waarom mens nog tyd en energie in skolerugby belê.

    ReplyReply
  53. @Losbal: …daar is baie met passie vir die game wat nooit gaan op hou nie, tenspyte van politiek en doomsayers. Lg. kan weer op die bandwagon spring as dinge weer goed gaan. That’s life!

    ReplyReply
  54. En dan is daar gelukkig ook baie realiste, met hulle koppe bokant hulle skouers en die skrif teen die muur verstaan. Net soos die weervoorspeller, ekonoom en die dokter die aanwysers, dankie tog, verstaan.

    ReplyReply
  55. @BOG: look this can easily be turned around, look at England a year ago….rock bottom! There is too much history & passion in SA for this to continue. We will get a decent coaching team and with a great young squad rebuild and do well in the next World Cup. Guys like Thomas du Toit, Marx, Malherbe, RG Snyman, Jason Jenkins, Du Preez, Kriel, Whiteley, Van Zyl, Pollard, Van Rensburg, Venter, Rhule, Senatla, Ulengo & Gelant we should be fine.

    ReplyReply
  56. @AbsolutMenlo: Gee vir ons jou keuse vir Springbok afrigtingspan!

    My ideaal sal wees om Nick Mallet as hoofafrigter aan te stel, ackerman as forward coach franco smit as backline coach tot world cup 2019 en dan nick to exit en ackers om oor te vat vir verdere 4 jaar

    ReplyReply
  57. @4×4: Do what England did. SARU must swallow a bit of pride and get a foreigner to take charge. Apart from Eddie Jones, the likes of Joe Schmidt and Vern Cotter are doing great work at international level. Perhaps we could land a coach like NZer Dave Rennie who has built up a respectable track record now.

    ReplyReply
  58. @beet: Million dollar question. Which foreigner, except for the Chinaman, Win One Soon, will accept a coaching job in SA and take all the crap that goes along with it? Fact is that this decline, actually complete melt down, is going to hasten the departure of young players. The underlying reasons why people are lining up, not just sportsmen, to leave SA, still exist. Anyway, the following just about sums up the general feeling about SA rugby.
    https://web.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1226865767397041&set=a.298147803602180.71549.100002208898015&type=3&theater

    ReplyReply
  59. @Alan Morrissey: I know that your Dutch was somewhat neglected in the Bluff. The caption- Ailistair Coetzee to Mabullule ??, says, “We only need to lose against Swaziland and Lesotho, for the Grand Slam”

    ReplyReply
  60. @4×4: @beet: Agree on a foreigner especially taking our current situation in consideration. Locally Swys De Bruin should be part of the set up with his people skills, positive attitude and attacking vision.

    ReplyReply
  61. @beet: Plumtree would do it, he knows SA well enough. BUT is he big enough for the job. Akers & Swys should be in the mix as assistants…

    ReplyReply
  62. I’m really keen to see a proper Bok trials game too, North vs South or Possibles vs Probables. The Trinations need to set up a proper Under20 tourno too. We just cannot allow the Poms to be No1. No more picking on reputation, Habana, Beast, Alberts & Pieterson should have retired after the last WC. It must be difficult to get a cap. Show video clips of previous Boks to build pride in the jersey.

    ReplyReply
  63. @BOG: No doubt there are many challenges facing SA rugby and the realistic possibility that we may one day become the equivalents of the West Indies to test cricket – a once great achieving nation that is no longer considered a threat. But like we are witnessing in the Protea test cricket at the moment, there is also hopes of a revival after a trough.

    Here right now today we still have and are producing many good rugby players in this land. So many good players that our leftovers are able to become established internationals in NH countries. Also SA born rugby players don’t automatically become non-South Africans the minute they travel to Europe or Japan either. Even if or when the standard of rugby goes down in SA, there is still going to be a national team. It may prove to be a competitive one or an uncompetitive one. The path forward can take Bok rugby in either direction at this point in time.

    Also with regards to coaches both in SA and abroad, supply exceeds demand. There are more decent coaches than there are decent paying coaching jobs. The opportunities to coach at the top are very limited. For the vast majority of coaches, these top job vacancies represent once in a lifetime opportunities, meaning when the offer comes around and they don’t take it, another similar chance will never surface for them again. Those sort of factors favour SARU at the moment. As long as SARU can still afford to offer a good package there are going to be interest in the position of Bok head coach. It remains a high profile position on the international stage.

    With what SA has in terms of talent, yes maybe NZ will be forever out of our league but certainly winning against Australia, Argentina, England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and France should remain decent odds on possibilities. However as we have witnessed this competitiveness objective cannot be achieved with a 2nd rate coach and/or coaching staff. Hopper’s point about the England turnaround in the space of a few months is valid. 12 of their 15 starters vs the Boks were in their same failed RWC 2015 squad.

    ReplyReply
  64. @BOG:

    Let’s be positive. We still have unbeaten records against Romania, Uruguay, Georgia, Namibia, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, Canada and the might USA. Let’s also hope we aren’t playing any of them anytime soon…….. :roll: :roll:

    ReplyReply
  65. @AbsolutMenlo: Well, why dont you share with us your contribution to SA rugby. Quite frankly, looking at the state of the game, it is reasonable to assume that nobody is making a contribution, other than in their fantasies and imaginations.@beet: What you say about the availability of coaches and players in SA, is certainly not being reflected on the playing fields. And as I pointed out, there are other underlying factors, the exchange rate just being one. And lets not get too excited about the odd spike, thinking that the ZAR is “recovering”. Its rather the $$ weakening. The trend is down—down—down—@GreenBlooded: At this moment, I would hope that SA is not playing some of those on your list, notably Romania,Fiji,Namibia, Tonga and even the USA. They might just fancy their chances against SA right now.

    ReplyReply
  66. @BOG: Our mutual interest on this blog is SBR and each and every school boy rugby player is contributing to SA rugby and I will continue to support them in a positive way. The opposite is to be part of the problem like you and Mbalula.

    Go and read Grey’s “Coat of Arms” again! You are a disgrace for that avatar!

    ReplyReply
  67. You’re stating what most people around here already know so again look one cannot ignore the problems/challenges facing SA rugby. But I’m of the opinion that even if we had prosperity in this country –say economic growth of 7-10% pa. Even if all the rugby transformation targets were reassessed to be in line with wealth redistribution and were set as longer term objectives like say another 20 -30 years to arrive at a 50% representative national teams. Even under those conditions, rugby in SA would be under pressure because the bottom line is we can’t keep pace with the salary packages being offered in Europe and Japan. It would bankrupt all our unions try match the top clubs payrolls even in the strongest local economic environment. Our best players are going to move abroad whether things in SA are good or bad. When European club youth schools start to pick like it happened with soccer, our school kids who want to become pro players will start moving over there as well.

    Overall SA has allowed itself to fall behind with regards our style of attack and defence. Even though we play a lot of rugby against NZ, we have not fed off their ideas. We had one SR team that chose a different approach and reaped the benefits. We had one CC team that also upped the tempo and were handsomely rewarded. If the evolution continues, it’s likely to filter all the way across and down and we may produce a better overall brand of rugby throughout SA. That in turn will just create greater overseas demand for our better locally based players. It would probably also mean our top local coaches would become recruitment targets of overseas clubs who can out-pay even the Bok national coach’s salary and any other rugby coaching related salary in SA.

    I look at Australian rugby. They don’t have the same political challenges but rugby is dwarfed by its winter sport rivals over there. They have managed this with a degree of success overcoming difficulties in the past. But financially they are in a big hole now. And it’s little to do with their economy and much to do with higher player salary expectations based on the increasing demand for good players being created in the northern hemisphere.

    Regarding the Boks on this disastrous tour. I bet this same Bok team that performed so poorly vs Italy and England could go back to those same venues and play against those same two countries strongest possible teams in 3 months time and produce results more in line with SA supporter expectations because the Bok team has the talent and ability but in order to achieve that they would need to be under the guidance of a good coach and support team, who the players have confidence in and who provides them with the essentials needed to succeed. None of that exists right now.

    ReplyReply
  68. @AbsolutMenlo: Im quite sick of you continuously throwing GCB in front of me when you are in a corner and unable to respond to a very reasonable question. Do you really see yourself as a role model? Thankfully, GCB does not produce uniform robots, but people with individual opinions. You may find that an alien concept and I truly hope that you are not a reflection of a standard Menlo product. I suspect not.

    ReplyReply
  69. @beet: I think that your first paragraph sums up the realities of SA rugbys future. Its not optimistic but acknowledges the realities which are in line with what happened in Zim and Namibia, perhaps just on a smaller scale. However you look at the situation, it is very unlikely, that with the different pressures, that SA will maintain the standards with which SA has been associated with. And that is my point. We will probably have to get use to mediocrity.

    ReplyReply
  70. @BOG:
    The reason why I’m throwing GCB in front of you is because you wear their avatar. For me GCB don’t accept mediocrity and is one of the organizations in SA like many others and individuals’ black and white that still makes a positive difference in their circle of influence. Unlike you that only concentrate on the negative and advocate that any positive contribution will be fruitless because of our circumstances!

    So my contribution is to have a positive influence where I go in order for our School Boy Rugby players and others not to give up on SA despite all the challenges … because by doing that you build character and will survive anywhere. For some this could be a role model and if so then you know the answer.

    ReplyReply
  71. @beet: Thing is, if we had been growing at 7%-10% the rand would have been much stronger and the player exodus would have been much smaller.
    So, @BOG: is correct in that this is much wider than just rugby.
    And Australia is in a different position as they are competing with league and needs higher remuneration for them just to continue competing.

    ReplyReply
  72. Interesting reading – not a lot of transformation players in these teams. Just a comment – not giving any opinion one way or the other.

    ReplyReply
  73. No decent coach will come and coach Springboks whilst the team is selected by the government and even if they do bring in someone respectful it won’t help as the current crop of players are pathetic.

    We do not have a world class front row

    No decent fetcher

    We need a Vunipola type of number 8

    Our 9 and 10’s are Sport Pienaar quality

    Give v Rensburg a chance but he is also too predictable

    All other backs are CC quality

    We have a bunch of players who are average in their mediocrity

    I’m saying it once again……we are bluffing ourselves to think our schoolboys are so excellent……they are excellent against other mediocre opposition……they do not possess the skills and technique to make the step up to international rugby by the age of 22

    I said this back in 2010 and 2011 and got thrown off sites for predicting this situation.

    And I’m not climbing on that “I told you so” wagon……..I DID predict this and I’m predicting now again…….this is just the beginning of complete uselessness unless skills, technique, vision get major priority at schoolboy level.

    ReplyReply
  74. Good Morning all you wonderful South Africans.
    The loss against Italy is bad, but not as bad as we think. In fact I think its great for SA Rugby to be in this position. Maybe SA Rugby will wake up and allow our players to play elsewhere in the world and then pick them for the SA Tests. SA Rugby can do what the professional soccer players do. Play for the best club sides, earn huge money as this is a career and then when a Test is to be played. You are picked and you play.

    ReplyReply
  75. @Djou: The overseas appetite for our players is huge and growing.

    The French club salary cap is currently in the region of R150 000 000 per annum (at our poor Rand exchange rate). That’s not operating cost budget, that’s pure player salaries plus they can still pay player bonuses outside that cap and apply for medical jokers outside that cap.

    In addition to this there is consist pressure from the club owners to increase the cap.

    The premiership cap in England is also being increased every year and growth is outgunning even what we would consider high inflation.

    Each top individual club basically has the salary spending power equivalent or more than what SARU gets from the SANZAAR deal (in USD).

    Even if SA halved and stabilised the SA exchange rate, the salaries they are able to offer on that side of the equator are still beyond the reaches of our major unions here.

    So again yes we can all point to internal factors that contribute to the player drain. It would be naive to ignore these. But somewhere in the process you also have to factor in the impact on rugby of things beyond the control of SA.

    The world has seen the same thing happen in soccer.

    This year Portugal and France contested the Euro 2016 final but 67% of the Portuguese players are based outside Portugal and so are 80% of the French team and those percentages of foreign based players account for their best players. The teams in those domestic leagues just cannot match the packages offered to the top players and even with the players they are able to afford and retain, many teams are stretched to the limit financially.

    ReplyReply
  76. @Bush: Bafan bafana is currently ranked 62 in the world. If that is good enough for you?
    To me that is pathetic if you concider the amount of players in South Africa.
    Hope that will NEVER be good enough for rugby!! 8-O

    ReplyReply
  77. @Djou: With regards to AFL and NRL in Aus, you cannot automatically assume that a top rugby player (highest earners) will make successful converts to league or footie and therefore earn top Aus dollars in the other sport. The competition for players is not that direct especially after school. Aussie rugby has its little place in their market and generates a respectable turnover. Definitely breakeven is a challenge for the ARU. They are forever working to increase that market share without much success. But at the end of the day when the ARU budgeted pay players an average of say Aus$250 000 pa and suddenly the market dictates that Aus$300 000 is the going rate for the same player in the NH, something has to give. With their time zones, they will not have the Saffa benefit of being able to watch European club games live at a reasonable hour of the day, if it comes to that one day in the future.

    ReplyReply
  78. @Riempies: Morning Riempies. I’m not a soccer fan. We need a disaster like the Italian game to move forward and to think outside the box.
    Think of it this way. We cry because we can’t pick our players that are abroad. We cry because of the coaching,the admin and the selection process is poor. Let the players go abroad. They will have the best coaching, play against the best teams and gain unbelievable experience. Imagine picking a 15 man team that has been playing hard French and Irish Club rugby for 2 years. Then you think what about the local players? They won’t get a look at. So what, we want the best and we want to win.
    It happens in cricket, think of county cricket in the UK.

    ReplyReply
  79. @Bush: Bush I cannot agree with you more. I believe in picking the best 23 player you can for each game. I am no fan of the current team and don’t believe that any coach would have had a better result. The coach not playing!! Yes he is suppose to be the plan maker but he can only coach! The players must execute the plan. If they do not do that then how can you blame the coach?
    This is not the best team with best combinations we could pick. So who ALL was involved in picking the team should be blamed for our poor performance.

    Then I have read in one of the newspapers or somewhere that the overseas players for the game against England cost SARU 11 Million Rand to get them out of their contracts for the match.

    This might be more the reason for not picking overseas players than anything else!

    Glad you not a soccer fan because if I was, I would by now have lost the plot completely. Cannot believe that this country is not up in arm about that. The Sport played by the majority of citizens in this country.

    ReplyReply
  80. @Andre T: Just a slight difference of your view..Our SBR players are good enough ..Else they would not be able to beat their English, Welsh and Irish counterparts (Who have been together as u/19 teams for at least 6 months) after only one week together..That happens every year with the SA Schools team etc. They can compete against the best. The problem is that after Jnr structures they move into an environment where all vision, skill and natural ability is basically drained from them for the next 2/3 years and you end up with robotic players we see churned out in Super Franchise and Bok jerseys…My biggest concern is that it starts happening at younger age more often nowadays..At the u/20 level we already can see the decline compared to the way they played just a season or two before against pretty much similar opposition. That is a coaching and structure problem…not a talent problem!

    ReplyReply
  81. @Riempies: Hate it when the Bafana-Boks comparison takes place. That Bafana Bafana hasn’t lost in 14 games. And this with no overseas based players.
    Nevertheless, I don’t think that’s the example Bush had in mind when he suggested that. Of the top 10 soccer teams in the world, only Germany (2) and Spain (10) have the majority of their players playing in the respective local leagues. On the same breath, The All Blacks don’t consider overseas based players at all. I personally am indifferent where the Boks are concerned – possibly skewed towards having no overseas players – but either way, one thing is for sure – if our structures remain the way they currently are, there will not be any improvement. I mean, you have a Brendan Venter who headed the SA Rugby Indaba just a month ago….and last weekend he was seen in the Italy coach’s box wearing a blue top :roll:
    What’s he doing there when it is brains like his that we clearly are in need of???

    ReplyReply
  82. @Playa: Have to be honest i know very little about soccer or structures or anything in South Africa. Just know if I was a supporter i would not have been very happy with their ranking. To me its sound very low in comparrison with countries that have a quater of our players? Again don’t know.

    But lets rather speak about rugby. One of the professional rugby players one’s told me that if you can only do something for a couple of year to earn big money would you do it or not? Only few player like Habana or perhaps Victor had this very long careers! The rest must take what they can while they can. You can only play rugby for so long!

    As far as the structures go we will always sit with this problem that their is not enough forward thinking decision makers out there. Some have been in that position for years and still believe that the old way is the correct way. If someone like Brendan Venter is as good as they say he is, then why did SARU or powers to be not sign him in some consulting role and add a stipulation in contract that he is NOT allowed to consult for any-one else but the Boks?
    SBR are sitting with some of the same issues. I personally believe that they should NOT allow a person to be part of key role or decision making role for more than two to three years. In some of SBR provinces we sitting with people that have had the same role for more than 5 years.

    This will have a negative effect on our senior rugby in years to come. We need to change on a constant basis.

    “You cannot expect to get a different result if you keep on doing the same thing”

    I believe like all things in live you can not always be on top. It is what you do when you down and out what defines you. Now that Bok rugby is down and out lets see what the powers can do to get them out. That will define them.
    BUT we need to give them the opportunity to do so! 8)

    ReplyReply
  83. @BOG: our own Doomsday prepper out of his bunker again

    Chris Hart and his r65 dollar with you? :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

    sad little man with is one pair of jeans and 2 shorts-you have given up long time ago-do the right thing

    ReplyReply
  84. @Riempies: Yeah rugby it is. A soccer top 10 ranking is a different beast to a rugby top 10. SA’s 62 ranking in soccer is very low – but it’s probably comparable to a number 10 spot in rugby. Hence the comparison doesn’t make sense.

    Back to rugby – a large part of the problem is what BHP has touched on. It cannot be stressed enough that the ‘BIG BOY-BASH IT UP AND BULLY UPFRONT – MAUL & KICK UP & UNDERS ALL DAY’ version SA teams seem to be stuck on are not only ineffective, but outdated. Proof in the pudding is Argentina about 10 years ago, and compare to their style today. 10 years ago, if you wanted an exciting, impulsive international in the Northern Hemisphere, you had to wait for the French to have a good day. Now, you are spoilt for choice, between even old dull England, and my oh my that Ireland backline looks like they have cloned Brian O’Driscoll. SA rugby just hasn’t evolved. We still write off 18 year olds because “they’re too small”.

    As for Brendan Venter – I can say for sure that his wisdom and expertise is certainly better than that of Franco Smith and Mzwandile Stick combined. And guess what – the Italians took him on as defensive consultant for the Bok game…not that it takes much of an effort to defend against the Boks, but I was hugely impressed with how the Italians handled their defence. There, we are stuck with a Johann van Graan that failed under Meyer, and continues to fail under Coetzee.

    You’re absolutely spot on when you say “You cannot expect to get a different result if you keep on doing the same thing”

    ReplyReply
  85. @AbsolutMenlo: I have, on a number of occasions said that there is absolutely no room for terms like “positive” and negative” in sport or politics. Just reality which is based on the INDICATORS. Go and meditate on that for a few days. If you think that my criticism is severe, you should go and read what is being said elsewhere. You are clearly out of touch with reality.
    And then we hear about Bafunny Bafunnys recent achievements- all in Africa of course. Perhaps the Springboks should only play on the continent as well, aka fools paradise.@boerboel: Go and chase a cat sunshine or mate with a Pit Bull

    ReplyReply
  86. @BOG: Clearly my reality differs from yours … there is a lot of positives in sport and politics, to many to list … but if you are a pessimist in a dark negative whole you will not be able to see/notice it,

    But Ja … let’s agree to disagree!

    ReplyReply
  87. My two cents worth on the state of SA rugby, spesifically the Springboks! I had a good chat to one of my long standing sports reporter colleagues about this subject. We came to the conclusion that the overall problem is poor selection, and a lack of a clear game plan.
    We agreed that AC was handed a curveball when he was handed the job. However, he fell into the same trap as his predecessors, in selecting players that he trusted, and coached at provincial level. Hence the continued inclusion of out of form players such as Damien De Allende, Juan de Jongh etc. When SA Rugby,s headquarters were still at Newlands (early 2001/2) there was a white board, similar those used in schools, showing the various players that made their debut in a particular year, and who the coach was. It was clear as daylight that all the coaches favoured the players that he coached at provincial level. This is to be expected , as coaches of the national side faces huge pressure, and they therefore go for players that they know, and trust.

    The only solution to this problem is to a) once again revert back to a selection panel, consisting of known, and still active rugby brains. The appointment of these selectors must not be politically motivated. A clear mandate, on what the quota (targets) is , must be given to them, which they must follow. The coach will obviously form part of this panel , but will not have a decisive vote.b) Appoint a coach that has a proven track record of success, are open to assistance from qualified people, and can command respect from the players.c) Players also need to step up to the plate, and not bank on their performances of the past , to ensure their continued selection.

    ReplyReply
  88. @AbsolutMenlo: Its very obvious that your reality differs from mine on this matter, and that of 99% of SA rugby supporters. Its also blatantly clear that you have no understanding of the term “positive”, I have really tried, clearly in vain, to explain to you that either “positive” or “negative” should be supported by reality or clear indicators. A doctor, weatherman, or economist who ignores the indicators, is not being “positive”. He is simply irrational (and irresponsible)

    ReplyReply
  89. @BOG: You are absolutely correct 99% know the indicators and have stated as such … “WE HAVE PROBLEMS things have to change to get better”.

    Now what? How do we react positive or negative? This is where we differ! So let me for the last time try to explain to you but I know from experience that it will be difficult for a pessimist to understand.

    Doctor absolute, after reading the “indicators” will still continue to assist his patient in a positive manner believing in a mericle … Doctor bog will give up on him.
    Absolute weatherman will go to higher ground and assist others after reading the “indicators” of a tsunami believing that it will past. Bog the weatherman will advocate that this is the end stay put. Same principle applicable for the economist.

    ReplyReply
  90. Yesterday I spoke to 10 people about the state of our rugby and 11 of them were completely negative and said we’ll never be a rugby giant again.

    So yes Bog, you are wrong with your 99%….it should be 110%

    ReplyReply
  91. @Andre T: Hahahaha… :lol: :lol: :lol:

    I was at a PSG Asset Management presentation, and there were two amazing take-aways I got from from a guy by the name of Philip Worz:
    1. Human beings love to find comfort in numbers – the company we keep tends to drive how we view the world, and therefore our perceived realities.
    2. Current conditions drive our view of the future as human beings. Because things are bad, we tend to believe that they will get worse, or remain bad forever. When times are good, we tend to think that they will be good forever and don’t adequately prepare for that unthinkable moment when the tide turns.

    It was funny how I immediately tied those two statements to what is going on with SA rugby at the moment. The two camps: the believers (optimists) and the non-believers (pessimists).

    Someone once quoted something on the blog, along the lines of:
    “Whether you believe you can, or believe you can’t, either way you are right”
    How true was that quote
    The optimists believe that if their suggested solutions are implemented, all will be well again, while the pessimist see a point of no return. Let’s just all agree to disagree.

    With that, I will agree to disagree with the 11/10 South African rugby supporters :mrgreen:

    ReplyReply
  92. @Andre T: The pessimist will focus on the problem/negative and things will stay the same … in fact get worse. No action!

    The optimist will move on … learn from the situation and be part of the solution. Action!

    What do you suggest we teach our school boy rugby players, because that is our common interest on this blog!?

    ReplyReply
  93. @AbsolutMenlo: I think everybody knows what a SBR should be taught but do SA coaches have the knowledge or should I rather say the “know how” to teach these basic skills, techniques, vision etc…..to our boys at entry level and right through their age groups in order for them to be an above average professional by the age of 22 ?????

    Let’s take a golfer…..a junior golfer can get away with a bad swing, poor technique, bad course management, average mental toughness, 50% work ethics and still win the SA Boys u/19 title but once he joins the pro ranks he is found wanted because of his shortcomings.

    All of a sudden he doesn’t trust his swing anymore under pressure, his grip, posture has been coached badly, was never coached how to manage a round, gets mentally despondent every time he hits a bad shot because now every shot can cost you money, and doesn’t like practising 8 -10 hours a day where before he could shoot 69 practising 2 hours a day, and then the biggest problem…..life coaching……..bars instead of putting green, discos instead of driving range, cigarettes instead of gym, girls instead of bunker shots.

    This applies to rugby as well….if you want to become a professional rugby player then work on the necessary skills and techniques and mindset that are required to become the best. If not, you’ll be Springbok 2016 quality.

    And……where in this country can I send my boy to a school or institution where these requirements are more important than chasing a 1 000 day unbeaten record?

    ReplyReply
  94. @Andre T: Your little jab at the end of your rhetoric is actually quite ironic because you can get all those requirements exactly at the school you are having a jab at and who have been so successful because they follow that criteria!..

    ReplyReply
  95. @BoishaaiPa: @Andre T: There’s footage of top NZ high school rugby teams available on the net. I don’t think you’ll see much to suggest their SBR teams are any more capable of working the ball around than our top school teams. There’s a lot of flair over there but we see a lot of it here too.

    Perhaps the problems starts after school where the conservative playing patterns pick up. This results in fewer passes and slower tempo playing styles which in turn lead to less sharpness among players, whereas our counterparts in NZ are coached to up the tempo and therefore tune in to faster decision-making.

    For many years we produced very solid defence at senior level and were able to play without that much ball. These days even our defence lets us down very often. Even our rolling mauls aren’t as great as they once were.

    If there is one thing SBR in SA is possibly guilty of it’s perhaps providing senior rugby too many useful players. So the senior rugby system has for years squandered the talent. If we only produced a few decent players every year, there would probably be a far greater emphasis on making sure that talents was maximised. Three of the four NH home nations battle for depth- they have taken Saffa players who we have considered surplus to requirement and turned them into internationals and got good mileage out of them.

    ReplyReply
  96. @beet: We need Marty Kaan and his team to come in and assess that whole transition from schoolboy to senior rugby. For the most part, schools pick players on their strengths and harness that. Our unions, right up to Bok rugby tend to pick players on ‘the strength the coach wants to see’.

    Interesting that you point out how our play gets slower and has less passes the more senior up the ranks you go – something that SA commentators have worryingly viewed as a sign of maturity, while the more adventurous, high tempo player is viewed as raw, and in need of further honing.
    :roll:

    ReplyReply
  97. My apologies, 99% of SA rugby supporters are 110% behind the team, the coaching staff and their record. Sure, and my grandfather was Pope Alfonso VI. Would this be deemed sarcasm or denialism? If I see the comments elsewhere, it is certainly the latter. But whatever makes you happy and comfortable in fools paradise—

    ReplyReply
  98. @beet: The one school that has been the most successful over a long period in SA at SBR plays exactly the same type of game NZ has been doing and bringing back into senior rugby. High paced end-to-end stuff with emphases on ball retention and turn over ball attacks. Grey have been playing the same style (albeit adjusted for the modern game) for many a year now and have a 90% plus success rate because of that. They could do that because they first had the players available and secondly because all their coaches buys into the same coaching philosophy. I have spoken with many an old Grey who played during the 70’s, 80’s, 90’s, and 2000’s and they all had the one simple philosophy learned at Grey that the ball is always quicker than the man. So fast accurate passing will always open more gaps than trying to run over or through an opponent.

    The rules of rugby have changed over years but simple adaptation to the rules doesn’t mean you have to compromise the style of play. You still need a solid pack that can win your ball at set phases, if you struggle there, you will always be on the backfoot in any case. But the fact remains that the style of play that Grey has adopted many many years ago stood the test of time and is still the most successful style that is displayed to this day at SBR level…and the AB’s is playing that exact type of rugby now at top level and is highly successful. There are lots of schools that are trying to implement the same style of play but it starts at u/14 level and you need buy in from all coaches to be able to eventually pick the fruits of your labour at u/19 level. Along the way those junior teams will loose some matches and once that happens coaches tend to panic and fall back into the “safe” zone of coaching again. The emphases is way too much on winning at jnr levels instead of trying to expand the skill sets of the players and let them learn to play the game as it is supposed to be played!

    We have proven that we can actually play the NZ style better than NZ can themselves at SBR level..and that it is actually most probably a Grey style..but all we need now is someone with vision to take the lead and implement the same styles into our senior teams. We have the players..of that I am sure..we just need to coach them back to their roots!

    ReplyReply
  99. @BoishaaiPa: Yes I agree with you. I do believe that the Cheetahs and Lions already doing this at senior level. This might be the reason for their success in 2016.
    I am happy to say that I also see this more and more in SBR. My father in law use to call the old style “stampkar” rugby were your inside center tried to run over every thing in his way.

    ReplyReply
  100. @BOG ..Well said… denialism ,mediocrity and political correctness is the new “positive attitude”…

    ReplyReply
  101. Would have loved to see AC back the full Lions 9,10,12,13&14 combination for tomorrow. Nonetheless, Francois Venter seemed to click with Rohan against the Barbarians. I also would have backed Willie ahead of Goosen to start at 15. Here’s to hoping the guys get given a bit of freedom to play to their individual strengths.

    ReplyReply
  102. As they say, rather late than never, but this comment at 365 was just too good to pass: ” SAs credit rating is apparently sinking towards junk status. SAs rugby, has, it seems, won the downhill race and reached there already, seemingly the lowest point ever in the proud rugby nations history”

    ReplyReply
  103. @BOG: All correct! What now? Do we give in or be part of the solution to turn the ship … either way the pessimists will always be there.
    Believe it or not there is already forces at work for change but a pessimist will not be able to see or believe in it. The pessimist is already doomed and that will be his reality any where in the world.

    ReplyReply
  104. AbsolutMenlo: Speaking about being “doomed”, do you think the pastor using obscure sprays to drive out demons and illnesses will have any effect on @BOG? Hehehe

    ReplyReply
  105. @BOG: see our bogsiener v rensburg call of a downgrade also disapearing in the mist.Rand at r13.91-Chris Hart probably on his 3rd chickenpie of the day

    what is your next prediction? :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

    ReplyReply
  106. You heard the saying, “stoning the messenger”? Obviously, all fired up after paying homage to the barbaric. murderous communist dictator, Fidel Castro ? Is anyone prepared to provide sanctuary to the incoherent Boerboel for December ?@AbsolutMenlo: These “forces” that you mention, must be very clandestine and “top secret”, as no one (but you) seems to know about them? Why not share with us the information to which you are privy, so that our “optimism” is based on substance and not fantasy? If I remember correctly, the very same “third force” was present in Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, Angola, Mozambique, Zim, Namibia—- but then simply “evaporated” ?

    ReplyReply
  107. @BOG: Dont avoid the fact you called our downgrade to junk as well as Chris Hart,,s call on a r65 to the $.

    fuckwit is an understatement

    ReplyReply
  108. @boerboel: I don’t think Bog ever put a date on the 65 to 1, trust me it’s coming boet. Maybe not now but within 5 years. Remember I’m an optimist too, went back to SA for 4 years because I was optimistic about its future. Unfortunately even being paid in the top 1% I found it difficult to see the positives. Worst country in the world for Maths & Science school standards & a minister who thinks that is good doesn’t bode well….no wonder our economists are half wits…

    ReplyReply
  109. @Alan Morrissey: Just ignore the dog. I advised him to chase a cat… Since then , he has become even more incoherent, and it seems likely that he was injured in the encounter. It is said that the underlying reasons for a downgrade to junk status, already exist, but the three rating agencies are, for political reasons, reluctant to do so. But that is simply delaying the inevitable. Chris Hart actually predicted that when the downgrade occurs, the ZAR/ USD exchange could hit R60/$1 by 2019. Several very reputable economists have said more or less the same. But there are those, including the dog, who are in denial. But you cannot talk to people whose ears are full of sand- so ignore. Here is the link. businesstech.co.za/news/business/123593/the-rand-could-hit-r60-to-the-dollar-by-2019-chris-hart/

    ReplyReply
  110. @boerboel: I don’t work in website design, it’s called digital analytics, Audience measurement and programmatic data onboarding. Never owned a Cortina, an Escort yes when 18, then a Golf 1…..it’s what us poor Bluff people could afford at the time whilst studying & paying off a student loan, both great cars…

    ReplyReply
  111. @Alan Morrissey: Censorship has arrived! Chase a cat , is what I said. Quite natural for a dog to do- even a stupid one.@boerboel: What about Cees Bruggemans, Magnus Heystek, Jesse Colombo, Marc Faber, RW Johnson, to name just a few. Get your head out of the sand and above your ass. You cannot trust those who work for large financial institutions because they just sing along with their pay masters. But speaking of avoiding an issue, what is the away win record of GCB in the Paarl, again? Or any other school for that matter? Bhwahahahaha!

    ReplyReply
  112. @boerboel:Boerboel you are communicating with an extraordinary human being here. He never had anything great, he’s worked so hard to achieve all of what he has. Never benefited from the past in any way whatsoever. Vat sy keel

    ReplyReply
  113. @BOG: show me their statements

    of the Rand to r65?

    reg gcb-i said their refs are very onesided and that grey record away from home is worse than their record at home-

    proven again this year against paul roos when the ref was ex grey and the linesman the coaches girlfriend-sad that once mighty grey has to revert to this

    ReplyReply
  114. @Rottweiler: it must be highly annoying to log off and on from your numerous accounts, although you could run different browsers and devices to make all your comments…..a bit desperate though…

    ReplyReply
  115. @Alan Morrissey: add paranoia as one of your issues when you speak to the doc

    gastric bypass may also be an option to improve your quality of life

    self esteem will also improve

    ReplyReply
  116. @Rottweiler: probably lived there longer than you have kippie. The world is a small place and people move about quite a bit. In fact, there are many SA companies with offices in London. So all of those people are ‘bangbroek’. Add Bob Martins to your chronic meds, along with some decent Eukanuba steak flavour……your brain seems to be dwindling from all that kak Epol you eating…

    ReplyReply
  117. Ja come on you mutts, leave Alan alone. Hey Alan howzit going? Family all well there in the U.K. ??????

    ReplyReply
  118. @Rottweiler: so you do the exact same thing and get personal, what a numpty. I think the Poms sent the Turkey’s packing, not the other way around. It’s not bangbroek, it’s called clever…..

    ReplyReply
  119. @Alan Morrissey: Was a great day Alan. Spear must turn Pro. He kept us in the prizes. Even got to meet the Pocket Rocket and Keagan Daniels. We were all very chuffed. Butch had a bad day and didn’t stay for Prize Giving. Have a lekker day further.

    ReplyReply
  120. @Bush: Nice! Flying the Toti club flag high I’m sure. Do you guys still play Westville OB’s and Ballito Dolphins?

    ReplyReply
  121. @Bush:

    Strewth – I saw that photo too. Looked like the who’s who of mega fuglyness. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: Did Beast shed any light on the woeful state of Springbok Rugby? Is there a way out of the wilderness?

    Toti Rugby Club. Legend of a place. Thing I like most about it – if you ask for a beer you get a quart as standard issue. If you want a pint you need to specify.

    ReplyReply
  122. @Bush: wow, times are a changing! Harlequins? Where they these days? I always remember playing Vryheid, bloody tough game that was every year. Saders, Rovers & Collegians were Angels compared to that motley crew…

    ReplyReply
  123. @Alan Morrissey: Harlequins were relegated by Toti and have struggled as a Club. Well done to Whal and his company for their outstanding support towards Club Rugby in KZN

    ReplyReply
  124. @Bush: gosh! I remember the glory days at Quins, with Rudi ‘Vleis’ Visagie, Wahl Bartmann, Cabous van der Westhuizen, Andre Joubert etc. Sad to hear…..

    ReplyReply
  125. @boerboel: You are delusional. Firstly, GCBs away record is almost on par with their home record- over more than a century. So stop BS yourself. When I gave you 48 reports with links to show a trend, you threw your toys out the cot. Now you want me to provide you with proof that they said that the ZAR would be R65 to the USD. No, Sunshine, they did not say exactly that, but did say that SA was heading for bankruptcy. If you use just part of your brain, you will know that it could end up even worse than R65.

    ReplyReply
  126. @Bush: Serious? What’s Spear’s handicap now? Will make a plan to set up a golf game in December holidays – staying at San Lameer

    ReplyReply
  127. @Die Ken:Morning, he’s a machine on the golf course. He was the Captain of our team and lead from the front. That’s sounds like a wonderful idea. San Lameer is a lovely course. I must just learn to swim as there’s more water there than there is in the Vaal.

    ReplyReply
  128. @Alan Morrissey: Ja the Mighty Quins. You mention names like that. In the hey days Provincial players still played Club Rugby. Now it’s very rare to see a regular Provincial player playing Club Rugby. The support at Club Rugby isn’t the greatest very few spectators, come down to Toti on game day. Fields are full with locals, kids running around and the braais are going. The Toti community supports their Club 150%. It was the same when Toti was in 2nd div. Maybe there’s nothing else to do in Toti. It’s wonderful to be part of that.

    ReplyReply
  129. @Bush: Yup. My home club that. I will get your number from Spear and will then arrange a game. Will have to invite him too :roll:

    ReplyReply
  130. Bush is a legend here in KZN rugby, and can hit a golf ball a mile. He drove the 18th, par 4, with a 5 iron. I played useless, had about 5 shanks, but we hung in there and came 5th and I won a Sharks coffee cup.

    One thing I can telll you is that I think Wahl can still go and fetch a ball at the bottom of the ruck.

    I haven’t walked a golf course for 15 years and I’m still so stiff I have to sit and pee

    ReplyReply
  131. @Speartackle: I saw Wahl at Monnas, didn’t look to good hobbling around. Years of smashing rucks & mauls have played a huge toll on his body. He can’t be more than 50 odd but walks like an 80 year old….

    ReplyReply
  132. @BOG: “almost on par”

    changing your story again

    r65$–show me these qoutes from all those okes you googled

    caught out lying yet again 8-O 8-O 8-O 8-O

    ReplyReply
  133. @Speartackle: Hey Captain you always sell yourself short, even with the Matures from H :twisted: :twisted: ters. The US of A want you as their next Captain. Spear the “Leader of Players”

    ReplyReply
  134. @Die Ken: Awesome to catch a game. Will be a little outnumbered by the Monnas supporters, nothing an old Soutie like me can’t handle.

    ReplyReply
  135. @Bush: How was that oke from Welkom with the gold chain at Hooters?

    You guys like the young and firm….I like the experienced ones

    ReplyReply
  136. @BOG: Will you ever provide proof of the origins of ‘Shosholoza’ being at a Tanzanian brothel? You’ve been depriving me of that education for too long now

    ReplyReply
  137. @Speartackle: Spear that oke with Gold Chains was hanging all over you. I thought you knew him from Krugersdorp. You said he was Headboy of Monnas back in the day. Very friendly guy, so friendly the bouncer chased him away.

    ReplyReply
  138. @Alan Morrissey: Have you worked out how sensitive you are, even when a comment is not directed at you. You need help. This world does rotate in the Axis of Morrissey. It’s not all about you.

    ReplyReply
  139. @McCulleys Workshop: It certainly doesn’t, thank goodness for that. There is a huge difference between being confident and arrogant, it seems you can’t tell the difference. Remember the world doesn’t revolve you and your golf cronies either. Your cheap jibes and under handed comments are looking for a reaction…..pot kettle comes to mind. Slaphead….work it out. Usually follically challenged..

    ReplyReply
  140. @Rottweiler: funny the lengths people who can’t leave SA try to justify staying, by trying to belittle those who have decided to go. It’s a classic insecurity, all the ‘another Kak day in Africa’ pics & jibes. I know who I am an no amount of childish attacks can change that.

    ReplyReply
  141. @boerboel: I have shared this story on several occasions, but considering your condition, let me repeat it once more. The labour lawyer was involved in negotiations with the trade union, probably Cosatu, and after months of back-and-forth exchanges of stupid trivialities, wrote to them,along the following lines: “if you continue in this vain, with your stupid childish remarks, you will leave me no alternative but to respond with two words, the first, having a sexual connotation” Knowing that you are slow on the uptake, let me provide you with a hint- the abbreviation. FO.@Playa: Ask political masters- the ones who spent time in Arusha, learning how to be “brave” cadres

    ReplyReply
  142. I wonder where the polisieman GB is now, strange BOG hasn’t been referred a gutterman with his latest comment.

    ReplyReply
  143. Anybody watching the Dubai 7’s. I see SA have a massive game at 10:00. If you not awake. Wake up and let’s get behind them. Spear I know you don’t like 7’s but make acception.

    ReplyReply
  144. @Die Ken: Home club, dan moet jy van my familie ken. My oom die klub gerun daar vir paar jaar en neef gaan nog gereeld soontoe vir vakansie. Eddie Dreyer, weet nie of jy vir hom geken het nie. Self al n hele paar rondtes daar gespeel/swem.

    ReplyReply
  145. @BOG: And there you go again with your insults and stereotyping.And still no answer to my question.Then you expect to be taken seriously.Mnxim.

    ReplyReply
  146. @Playa: Morning King Playa. Had a lekker chat to Keagan Daniels at a recent golf day. What a great oke. They make real gentlemen at Dale?????

    ReplyReply
  147. @Alan Morrissey: Hopper, I don’t need to remind you that no-one who is confident needs to tell you that they are confident, only those pretending. No one confident needs to tell you their degree status, job title, how many people report to them, what car they drive and the private schools they want to send their kids to. So you can stop it now. If you think you’ve been caught in a pie storm with your mouth open, it really is ok, but if you notice Boels comments, he tends to pull the fat card. How does that relate to you?

    ReplyReply
  148. Blitzbokke in the finals against Fiji. Will be awesome if SA can arrive home to play next week with the Dubai title. Capetown is going to be wild. Very stoked I have tickets.

    ReplyReply
  149. @Alan Morrissey: No one asked you what you studied, what degree you have, no-one asked your job description, no-one asked how many people reported to you, no-one asked what car you drive or what 20 yr old whisky you drink. No-one asked you to pull your pants down and run around with your “I love Alan” tattoo on your arse. The only reason you revealed your name is for the same reason you have revealed any of this other shit – low self esteem. I don’t care if you are Alan or Dave or if you went to Glenwood or Kes, if you are a policeman or DJ, drive a 3 iron or a BMW. Just grow a pair and be authentic.

    ReplyReply
  150. @Playa: No insults, and ditto for the same advice for you. Arusha by the way, after Quatro in Angola, was where the second most MKs were killed by their own. Want proof of that as well?

    ReplyReply
  151. @Playa: Very messy if the bachelor party ends up at the 7’s. Sounds good Playa I will be in Capetown for the week maybe we can do dinner. We can sing Shosholoza before dinner and after dinner. I found this place” Vue at The Capital Mirage” if you keen let me know. BOG has my number???????

    ReplyReply
  152. @Playa: I was there. I saw, I heard, I digested. And you ran to Africa check. Believe what you want.I really dont care. And you will continue to chase hot air. It reminds me of the panelist, for young school children, who said to little Sipho, “you answerd the question correctly, but because it offended Johnny, he will get the point”.That is the world we live in- lies and distortions.In the meantime, read this. https://web.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=658711250976980&set=gm.1170111806370130&type=3&theater

    ReplyReply
  153. @BOG: You are a lone voice stating that Shosholoza originated in the brothels of Tanzania. You know this because you were there? I wish I could at least say you were entertaining. But I could never view your open racism and obvious hatred as entertaining.

    ReplyReply
  154. @BOG: Just as I am sure there are those who believe Shosholoza originated at Ellis Park in 1995, or that Waltzing Matilda started as a post-anthem-pre-match Aussie song, or that Swing Low Sweet Chariot originated at Twickenham….all because that is where they heard these songs for the first time.
    As usual – everything ties back to race with you. Hopefully, you won’t throw a race card or answer me with a link to a facebook opinion piece on race relations when I ask you for Bush’s number.

    ReplyReply
  155. @McCulleys Workshop: Your misplaced and distorted opinions would regard anything that is not “politically correct”, as racist. Part of the problem and why Trump won. The world is sick and tired of PC and pretenders like you.@Playa: As I said, what you think, is fine with me. @AbsolutMenlo: You must speak to the folks at the Bulls for being so “negative”. They obviously do not know about the efforts by people like you, “behind the scenes”? “Bloei”, for those unfamiliar with the Afrikaans vernacular, is “BLEEDING”. https://web.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153846125842132&set=a.10150805271957132.400320.686062131&type=3&theater

    ReplyReply
  156. All I want to say today is how sweet it was to see the best ever SA born batsman yesterday. Kevin Pietersen you are a wizard. So sad that the SA public was deprived of seeing this pure class stroke maker more often.

    I wonder where Goolam Bodi, who kept him out of the Natal team back then, is now?

    ReplyReply
  157. @Speartackle: Based on how good Pietersen went on to become, there must also be some serious around the braai bragging rights to be enjoyed by 1 or 2 former Maritzburg College 1st XI players that kept KP out of that team when he was at school.

    Did I tell you about the time in u14 when I Roy Pienaar style cover drove Shaun Pollock for 4. Sure the pitch was a bit subcontinentish but it was at the Danville Park in Durban North so it counted as Beachwood’s home ground :mrgreen: I’m sure that from that day onwards Pollock focused on line and length and intelligent bowling as opposed to raw pace.

    ReplyReply
  158. @beet: Yep, I remember watching KP play 2nd team, a No8 or 9 batsman and tweaked little offspinners, nothing too exciting. I was about 1st year out of school. Another was watching Butch James play 2nd wing, I’m not sure he actually played 1st team at College…

    ReplyReply
  159. @BOG: You’re not quoting Menzi Solomon Shange. Do you know anyone that’s met “him”, or been to a speech that he gave. Or are you quoting him simply because whoever is writing his lines appeals to you.

    Fake news, fake writers, we’re apparently living in this post-truth world. John on emotion and agreement, low on fact.

    ReplyReply
  160. @BOG: BOG, on a more serious note. The Headmaster at Grey I heard wants to implement a few changes. He wants to start with changing the School Blazer and then The School Badge. Surely you Old Greys must be doing the Zulu Dance to the sound of Shosholoza. Haven’t you started a movement #dumbheadmastermustfall.

    ReplyReply
  161. @BOG: “You seem to regard everything not to your liking as “fake”.” 8-O 8-O 8-O 8-O Did you just say that????Bhwahahahaha

    ReplyReply
  162. @Speartackle: Goolam was the RamSlammer of 2015, got banned for 25 years as a result

    @Alan Morrissey: KP did play for the 1st XI, actually received Colours and Scarf. Was kept out of the team by Faf Cairns. Butch played for the 1st XV in 1997 as a flyhalf. Was injured in 1996 with an ACL injury. Never once played wing, only flyhalf or centre.

    ReplyReply
  163. @Bwana: I never said KP didn’t play 1st team, I said I saw him play 2nd team, must have been his 5th form year. Point is he wasn’t anything spectacular on the batting front. He played against current conveynor of selectors, Linda Zondi who was an excellent batsman & keeper. I saw Butch on the wing with my own eyes, maybe as an injury replacement. I played 3rd side in 1996 vs College reserve 2nd team. 1995 & 1996 were very strong years for College and exceptionally weak for Glenwood….

    ReplyReply
  164. @Roger: I can confirm that Chulumanco Macingwane is indeed a real person, and I can believe that the words in the article are his own :mrgreen:

    Whether SA Rugby can reinvent themselves lies in the “testicular fortitude” to acknowledge these problems.

    ReplyReply
  165. @boerboel: do you really think I’m going to listen to a dimwit like you, win or lose against Boishaai I have the democratic right to comment here. Email me directly and see how brave you are then. Ask Beet for my details…

    ReplyReply
  166. @Bwana: I certainly don’t, I learn something new every day. But what I do know is I was sitting on the bank on Goldstones and saw James playing wing. My mate Jason Brennan tackled him out into touch 5 metres away from me. That’s not knowing it all, that’s fact!

    ReplyReply
  167. @boerboel: Because you made up a bet. Why would I bet with someone who continually bashes me personally and ridicules nearly every post I make or anything to do with Glenwood….a bet usually happens between two people who shake hands on it. Currently you do not have my respect and I wouldn’t shake your hand…

    ReplyReply
  168. @BOG: If you’re going to quote people then the onus is on you to prove its not fake. Simelani is fake. Prove me wrong. I can see you’re about to start with the conspiracy theorists. Alex Jones can be only a heartbeat away.

    ReplyReply
  169. @Cappie: No, they are “mates”. Bhwahahaha! I suggested a pit bull, but he obviously went for a Rotweiler.@Alan Morrissey: I gave him some very simple advice, even an abbreviation, but still, he does not understand. Ignore him. But for what it is worth, the advice, was to FO !@Gungets Tuft: You are irrational. Clearly, you filter out everything which does not accommodate your political agenda or misplaced opinions. You are happy to accept Players verbal confirmation of someones identity, but want “proof” of Simelani, because what he says, blows everything you stand for, out of the water.Of course he uses a pseudonym, but the rest is very authentic. Are you really so naive to think that there wont be very serious repercussions for him or his business if he said that under his own name? And if you think that the things he said are so out of the ordinary, (for a black person), you are even more mistaken. But typical wannabe liberal, everything not to your liking, becomes a “conspiracy” theory. You no doubt get theories, but many happen to be true. But it is easier to discredit them as “conspiracy theories” than to deny them or prove them wrong. Go and indulge in the Huffington Post where you can feel comfortable and develop your liberal delusions without interference.But the world is changing- Brexit, America, Italy, Ireland, France, Germany, Netherlands, Greece— And while all of this is happening, least we lose perspective, SA rugby is in a state of collapse and bleeding profusely- along with the rest of the country.

    ReplyReply
  170. @BOG: The only filter is fact from fiction. I’ll read anything and process it rationally. I’ll read what known and thoughtful authors write and have them inform my thoughts and opinions. You’re the drowning man, clutching at straws.

    The bet still stands, name the day. You’ve still not agreed to substantiate the very first of your claims, and that from a known (unreliable) source, so give us a reason why we should be listening to your nonsense.

    By contrast, I’ll bet my last cent that Playa would pick me up from the airport if I flew to Cape Town to verify his sources and claims. In fact, I’ll test that in the new year, I’ve got work down there.

    OCD, sure. Deluded …. you’d recognise it …

    ReplyReply
  171. @boerboel: actually never heard that before. You see you earn respect, you haven’t. You haven’t made one positive contribution here. Even your last comment was a jibe. Take that massive chip off your shoulder and make a positive contribution…

    ReplyReply
  172. @Gungets Tuft: Happy to reimburse your flight costs, and buy you dinner if he turns out to be a phantom character. Dinner will be on you if he does indeed exist, and provides poof that the article was his own work :mrgreen:

    @BOG: I am pretty sure that Beet can also attest to the guy’s existence. I would assume that as a regular on this blog, you would have some sort o respect for what he says and writes. I will gladly nudge him in the direction of his memory bank if the name does not ring a bell. You can alternatively call the headmasters of SACS and KES if you believe beet also has his “head in the sand”. :mrgreen:

    ReplyReply
  173. @Playa: I guess it’s on your laptop in a Word file, then, Playa. Well done!

    Wanted to comment, but somehow can’t.

    ReplyReply
  174. @boerboel: if that’s what you think you were doing then I’ll let you believe that…shame small things amuse small minds…

    ReplyReply
  175. @tzavosky:

    Refer to post 308 –
    “I can confirm that Chulumanco Macingwane is indeed a real person, and I can believe that the words in the article are his own :mrgreen:

    Confirm – I know for a fact such a person exists. I know him personally

    Believe – I DON’T know for a fact that he wrote the article ( I haven’t checked that with him), but it is written along the lines of the thinking I know him to possess.

    Semantics :roll:

    ReplyReply
  176. “You are irrational. Clearly, you filter out everything which does not accommodate your political agenda or misplaced opinions.” @Gungets Tuft:

    Christ- that is the pot calling the kettle black if I have ever heard it :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

    ReplyReply
  177. @Alan Morrissey: was always on the cards – Jet Jennings and SA Cricket do not see eye to eye and Keaton stated way back in 2012 that it was intention to qualify and play for England.

    Pity – great player and if I am not mistaken was both SA Schools and SA under 19 captain.

    They need to tighten up the eligibility criteria though – if you have played u19 or 21 level for one country in either rugger or cricket you need to serve out at least 5 years before qualifying for another country. Who was the big number 8 for England against Aus? Got straight off the plane from Fiji!!

    ReplyReply
  178. @Roger: I may be wrong, but I think the World Rugby Union has put that in place. Once you represent a country at U20 level, you can never represent another country.

    ReplyReply
  179. @BOG: Bog I’m still fascinated to know what you where doing in the Brothels of Tanzania where you “saw heard and digested” the MK members singing the original version of Shosholoza. Was it a research thesis for your church or were you being entertained by the ladies of night? Must have been tricky if they weren’t of the same hue as you. Did you have your safari suit on, brill cream, comb in your sock and half jack of Klippies in your pocket?

    ReplyReply
  180. @Playa: It’s actually i) national team ii) 2nd most senior team as designated by the particular country.

    In the case of SA it’s the u20’s as from 2012, but for England it could well be the Saxons, not sure.

    ReplyReply
  181. @Roger: Billy Vunipola was born in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.[2] After moving to Wales with his family as a child, he was educated at Griffithstown Junior School, and subsequently the Castle School in Thornbury, England, and played junior rugby for Thornbury RFC before winning a scholarship to attend Harrow School.

    ReplyReply
  182. @Roger: I make no excuses for my political views (I claim to be human only), nor for my preference for fact. I believe inventions of statistics to be dangerous because they mistake the problem and lead to poor (or no) remedial action. It could easily be confused with OCD. I’ll live with it. I have strong opinions but can be swayed by factual and rational argument. I remain unswayed so far …

    ReplyReply
  183. @Gungets Tuft: my pot kettle comment was directed at Oom Bog ………. the “You are irrational. Clearly, you filter out everything which does not accommodate your political agenda or misplaced opinions” comment that was directed at you I found hilarious!

    ReplyReply
  184. @Playa: I’ll have to engineer an overnight er, and dinner is still on me, I still have that smidgen of regret about a previous rant. Maybe we can take a drive up to Orania and meet up with Bog.

    ReplyReply
  185. @Gungets Tuft: The petty comments here reminded me of your-and others discussion of hamburgers in Bloemfontein, after the match, a few years ago, Everything, BUT rugby. Old Dodger became so flabbergasted that he addressed “Christ”, but I guess if he knew Him, he would have done so with a great deal of respect. Your “prefernce” for fact? Now that, is what I would call funny. You should offer a few lessons to Mc Culleys—.@Playa: I did not question that persons reality- I merely made a comparison between him and Simelane. Think, even if its a challenge.@McCulleys Workshop: Your attempt at humor is rather weak. Stay clear. I said that I was in Arusha, sunshine. Pay attention. And it does not even work for you, trying to avoid the truth.

    ReplyReply
  186. @Gungets Tuft: Aargh…not to worry about that.
    Just warn me in advance so I can organise an ID document with the name Menzi Simelani for smooth entrance into Bog’s home. He has no idea what ‘he’ looks like anyway so it should be an easy walk in.

    ReplyReply
  187. @BOG: I might be mistaken google maps, google earth and other liberal fake news sources state that Arusha is in Tanzania but oh well… the scourge that is fake news.

    Unlike everything you say which I ABSOLUTELY love because it is clear, factually correct statements, which stem from first hand experiences by yourself. You were compelled by your god given duty that you had to follow the MK cadres into those establishments of Arusha……. hence that is how you know definitively where the origins of SHOSHOLAZA are from :wink: :wink: :wink: .

    You always talk about corrupt politicians, I often wonder if you appropriately digested what the actions of money grabbers like Jurie Roux and the myriads of administrators like him who have helped themselves to the Kitty to your dismay you will shocked as they will not match your pre-conceived notions of what represents a thief :roll: :roll: . The sponsorship well for SA rugby is dwindling not because the product is bad but because the rot is so embedded in the culture of the sport and instead of eradicating it from the sport. They simply rely on people like to stoke the fire of hatred and division and they can carry on in the merry way.

    I prefer to have my head in the sand than to hear your bigoted perspective on everything where the liberation of Africans is to be blamed for every conceivable evil that occurs. Stuff happens deal with it and move on. Or emigrate and leave us be in our sandpit already!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyReply
  188. @Ringo: The rot really started with Louis Luyt……maybe even further back than that. I dare not mention the famous one…

    ReplyReply
  189. @Playa: Best you make that fake ID for Menzi Solomon Shange, our invisible black Afropessimist. Menzi Similane is a previous head of the NPA, he might have a few friends in low places who might frown on fake IDs. Shaun “Bedford” Abrahams might have a word.

    ReplyReply
  190. @Ringo: Did I say that Arusha was NOT in Tanzania? On the contrary. Ask your little buddies here- even they should confirm. And here is an “aid”- a study guide so to speak,to equip you for your sandpit.@Gungets Tuft: Ah, I noticed that you and Player are considering paying me a visit in “Orania”. Let me spare you the trip. With my very blended family, I would get too many stares there- not quite as bad as in Bishopscourt, Houtbay, Sandton, or in Westville or La Lucia, but a few, nevertheless. Some help— http://www.news24.com/Opinions/Voices/a-mafia-state-in-the-making-4daysindecember-20161204-2

    ReplyReply
  191. @Ringo: apologies for my belated response to your comment on “liberation of Africans”. When did that occur? I am aware that they have been TRYING ever since Kwame Nkrumah back in 1959, but as far as I know, they have not succeeded in doing so anywhere (in Africa) yet. They seem to be more enslaved now, than ever before- under the yoke of corruption, incompetence, cronyism, lust for power — And I dont seem to be isolated in holding this opinion. Go and read the book by Martin Meredith on the history of colonialism in Africa. By all accounts, and those were my personal observations as well, was that they were better off under colonialism than what they are now. Apart from the political elite of course. In fact, mostly criminals who are masquerading as “governments”.

    ReplyReply
  192. @BOG: You either suffer from Alzheimers or as I have suspected for sometime now, you don’t think before your write, and you don’t read what you write.

    ReplyReply
  193. @Playa: Fundemental Christianity where you are righter than right (excuse the pun) because God told you so (and no one can argue with that), is a complex condition, and gets even more confusing when you add whiter than right fascist political bias, let alone any other co-morbid conditions. Not even the simplicity of school boy rugby can help. One black one, one white one, one Indian one, one Chinese one proves what, that you are actually Brad Pitt?

    ReplyReply
  194. @BOG: No Boet, that’s a diversionary tactic. First, you talk about a blended family which I couldn’t care about even if I did believe it, but now you rush off to state capture to somehow support your failed BEE and quota selection argument. That’s where this started, then got to white squatter camps. State capture has nothing to do with white squatters, so let’s not open a new argument until you settle the old one. You want to hear my opinions on state capture and the general state of government, show me 400,000 white squatters. It’s easy, 1/2 your original number, we should be finished by lunch time.

    ReplyReply
  195. An incoherent response to the truth, is what can be expected from a collective of pseudo intellectuals and misguided liberals and disillusioned and politically confused socialists. But how otherwise, if you are reliant on “Africa check”, Unicef and the ANC website for your information? In the meantime, SA rugby is bleeding to death- along with the country. As they are saying in America, “Suck it up Buttercups” !

    ReplyReply
  196. @McCulleys Workshop: My sincere apologies for omitting the atheist/”evolutionist”/fools in my comment. I acknowledge that your faith must be very strong to believe the crap you believe in.

    ReplyReply
  197. There’s good in SA.Bush is actually white…I didn’t take his land…he didn’t turn to Alan because he didn’t move to England and didn’t bleed with SA rugby and the country and didn’t sing Shosholoza in a brothel in Arusha and Playa didn’t rape his daughters….what a fucked up country we live in

    ReplyReply
  198. Just when I though hostilities were over – it turned out to be a 4 day ceasefire to bury the dead and take care of the wounded…… :( :(

    ReplyReply
  199. Let’s bring on the SBR. Hope then there will be bodies to bury. I’m looking forward to digging a few holes. Hopefully the refs are fit, strong and can keep up with the game. Awarding tries from the 25 and half way shows bad off season training.

    ReplyReply
  200. @Speartackle:

    It was great – but very poor organisation and team management. Never understood why a management team of 3 adults cannot deliver a team of 10 kids to a match venue on time when the venue and residence is within walking distance. So a lot of waiting for officials, teams to pitch etc. But great action and skill on display.

    ReplyReply
  201. @GreenBlooded: Now why don’t you use those words when BOG is going mad. Aren’t there any criminals you need to go and catch? You can make a difference.

    ReplyReply
  202. @Playa: Morning Playa, thanks for joining us last night. Cape Town is a beautiful city. Looking forward to the KERF week.

    As for GB all he can say is that he’s perfect and I’m a gutter ball. Any way who’s he in my life, nothing. GB I have a ton of love to give more than Rotweiller. Have a lekker day. In fact I will wish you a Merry Christmas now.

    ReplyReply
  203. @Bush: Absolute whale of a time.You’re not as bad as people make you out to be.Thanks for inviting me….you have a lovely family there.KERF next….I still owe GB a beer – if Gungets makes it maybe we can even squeeze in a tour of SAs squatter camps… :arrow: so you can spread your love in the tent at KERF.

    ReplyReply
  204. @Rottweiler:

    Me catch criminals? I’m a sparky not a cop.

    @Bush:

    Peace and Love Bro.

    @Playa:

    Nah I’ll skip the beer tent and stay on the bleachers. Sounds like there are too many okes who might want to moer me. Dunno why – I mostly stayed out of the political argument. Just kakked ou Bush out for being disgusting a few times.

    ReplyReply
  205. @GreenBlooded: Love and Peace GB, you can wear your peace sign and happy crystal necklace. I have a ton of love to give. After a few beers you may even look like a 10.

    ReplyReply
  206. @Playa: Out of self preservation I might have to be the first to moer him :roll:

    GB – don’t worry. I’ll go in 10 minutes ahead of you. By that time Dan Roodt and Stevie Hofmeyer will have punched themselves out, the cops will have left and the blood cleaned up, the coast will be clear for a jol.

    ReplyReply
  207. @Speartackle: Im sure the nice folk here- the obvious minority, missed my presence. Even the assholes. I visited my daughter in the Zulu kingdom for a few days. Hell, Im still in absolute shock. Having traveled through Africa quite extensively, I would consider myself as being “street wize”. But even that did not prepare me for the shock. Driving through Glenwood, down “Che Guevara” Rd/Dve/lane, I could not help to think of the irony. They have a “Avenida de Che Guevara” in Havana, Cuba, too but the destruction, decline there, was “achieved”, over a period of +- 50 yrs. In Durban, just over 22 yrs- and that without the help of weapons of mass destruction or a nuclear device. Heck, I have renewed admiration for you chaps in Durban who are still able to retain your senses, but at the same time greater understanding and sympathy for the majority who have lost it. It does give me a greater perspective of the crap you talk. But help and therapy is available- get it.It is absolutely, because I notce that you have had the same effect on the odd one, elsewhere. And then came PMB. When I think about it, a still become choked up.How many women and children does one need to murder before a street in Durban is named after you? Thankfully, my daughter only has another year left.

    ReplyReply
  208. @Speartackle: In SA, as elsewhere, the classical liberal has disappeared since the 50s, when the communists sought a more acceptable, presentable and marketable image for themselves. What we have now, and that is well illustrated here, are the wannabes, delusional and useful tools/fools, political misfits, crackers/cranks, masquerading as “liberals”. Google Yuri Bezmenov, who was a KGB operator, who defected to the US in the 70s. Hear what he said about 30 yrs ago, how they recruited useful idiots- liberal politicians, academics, unionists with long term goals in mind. Then look around you and things become a lot clearer. For example,the mentor of Obama, was the Chicago communist, Frank Davis Marshall.

    ReplyReply
  209. @Playa: No, not “seasons greetings”, “happy holidays” or “Happy Xmas”, BUT a very big Merry CHRISTmas” to you as well. And may your finances, along with your offspring, increase during 2017

    ReplyReply

Leave a Reply