St John’s Easter Rugby Festival 2013

DATE SCHOOL SCHOOL
Thu.28Mar New Orleans 05 08 St John’s (Zim)
Thu.28Mar Presidents XV 00 52 Nelspruit
Thu.28Mar Waterkloof 57 00 Noordheuwel
Thu.28Mar Marais Viljoen 17 45 Windhoek Gim
Thu.28Mar HJS Paarl BH 36 14 Daniel Pienaar
Thu.28Mar Filton (UK) 35 29 St John’s
Sat.30Mar Noordheuwel 12 26 Windhoek Gim
Sat.30Mar Marais Viljoen 21 13 New Orleans
Sat.30Mar Presidents XV 07 33 Daniel Pienaar
Sat.30Mar St John’s 15 18 St John’s (Zim)
Sat.30Mar HJS Paarl BH 72 05 Filton (UK)
Sat.30Mar Nelspruit 17 22 Waterkloof
Mon.01Apr New Orleans 20 22 Presidents XV
Mon.01Apr St John’s (Zim) 06 40 Windhoek Gim
Mon.01Apr Filton (UK) 22 52 Nelspruit
Mon.01Apr Marais Viljoen 13 19 Daniel Pienaar
Mon.01Apr Noordheuwel 35 31 St John’s
Mon.01Apr HJS Paarl BH 20 26 Waterkloof

69 Comments

  1. @Woltrui, well JHB is closer to home for Klofies so it could be considered a ‘home’ game with local supporters. Not too sure how well Boishaai travel but only time will tell…..

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  2. n paar lekker games wat opkom vir ons. dan weer die grote…..vs Bois!!! 19-18 verlede jaar so gaan hopelik weer n riller wees!!

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  3. @Grasshopper:
    i can tell you Grassy there was no shortage of supporters for the Bois from Paarl. not to mention the crowd sitting in the stands entertaining the Gauteng folk with their chirps and stuff!! wonderfull!!

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  4. @Klofie Pa: Yip..There is a big oldboy fraternity up in Gauteng that always support the Boys from Paarl when they play at St Johns. They dont often get the chance to see their old Alma Mater play and the festival gives them that oppertunity. They also always organize some kind of social event and last year i know they had Mannetjies Roux up there to talk to the players.

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  5. @BoishaaiPa: The game against Danial Pienaar will be good they will have a big pack of forwards and some good backs so dont be surprissed they just pull through this one.

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  6. @BOG: No..this is not the same as OG’s. It’s only the Bloem lot that can be seen as refugees when they leave. That is why there are so many OG noggins all over the country..no-one wanted to stay in Bloem!

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  7. @Bog, yes very impressed with Bloem, lovely suburbs etc but not too sure how much business and money is there. A great place to grow up maybe but then to make money you probably need to move to the big 3 cities.

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  8. @Grasshopper: People must start changing their attitude about money. Until recently, money was the yardstick to “measure” success- wrongly so. Its not a question of if, but just a question of WHEN before the whole money system collapses. We are not just experiencing another recession as in the past. Its much more serious and the cause? DEBT!!! And there are mountains of it. In 5 short years from now, the US will require two thirds of its current budget simply to service its debt. That is scary! And America is not an exception. In SA we will experience a collapse of the currency- its coming. Why am I discussing it here? Because its going to have a profound impact on rugby, specifically professional rugby.

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  9. @rugbyfan: Definitely not that clean around Hamilton and Mangaung (near the Hestony Depot), but the stretch from the Noord Stad entrance down Eeufees (Helicon Heights, Waverley) as well as Dan Pienaar and Heuwelsig is neat and tidy. Lived there for a while and although I enjoyed the people, a Capie cannot live without the mountain and the sea.

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  10. @BOG: Interesting, if slightly hysterical and maybe unfounded thoughts on the SA economy, but specifically want to know what you base your prediction of the currency collapse on.

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  11. @Ploegskaar: The first is superficial- its Africa an no country on the continent, has yet escaped that. What is happening in SA is NO different to that what has happened in the rest of Africa. Let no one tell you otherwise. Go and read “The State of Africa- A History of Fifty years of Independence” by Martin Meredith. Its a must read for everyone- challenging with 700 pages in small print, but nothing is hidden. Secondly, SA is riding on the crest of sympathy(financial) for the “emerging” markets, polite word for the underdeveloped/third world. We see large amounts borrowed elsewhere at rock bottom interest rates, around 3%, and invested here, VERY SHORT term at around 9%. That can virtually disappear overnight. The slightest spark or catalyst,, eg a court ruling in favour of a land grab, could start a flight of capital as we have not yet seen, with the inevitable decline in currency. Keep in mind that SA as a foreign borrower, will see her foreign debt escalate proportionately to the devaluation of the currency. That means in practice, that if the value of the currency halves, the debt will double. Remember too, that 4 international credit rating companies, Tosca Fund, Moodys, Standard and Poor and recently, Fitch Ratings, have downgraded SA as a borrower. Thats just the start.And the effect on rugby? You tell me, but a major in rocket science, is not required to work that one out.

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  12. @Ploegskaar: Unfounded?? No, those are hard facts. I know that most, including the banks, are in denial, but that does not change anything. How many, in 2007 predicted what we are seeing now, yet some(including myself) have been warning of this since the 70s. It was said then, that we are living on the money of our grandchildren- thats now. Yet the banks and their economists were blind to it- self preservation. Dont confuse the availability of credit/debt with prosperity- thats deception. :idea:

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  13. @kcman: Glad I could entertain you- and its free. Hang on to those 6 houses on the Port Alfred marina with an imported skiboat under each one (Paid for in cash of course) I read about the Durban metro constable (gross salary R15000 pa) living in a R20 mill home with 2 Lamborghinis, a Ferrari, a Rolls and more. Those are the people we need as role models. Amercans cant do that! :lol:

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  14. @Grasshopper: I know quite a few successful people in Bloemfontein, so I would not say it’s an over-depressed city. One of the cleanest cities in SA and the friendliest people, I spent a few very fond years in Bloemfontein as a youngster out of school and always have a soft spot for the place.

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  15. @Playa: Sadly, my views are often perceived to be negative. Not at all, but if you have dinner at your home and one of your guests come and tell you that your bedroom is on fire, you dont tell him that he is being negative. Very briefly, based on my faith, I am VERY positive.@kcman: Come now, dont be modest. Your wealth is well known in the Eastern Cape . That policemans lifestyle is being investigated, but he and his wife may walk out of court free, because the prosecution cannot finalise their docket. If a constable in Durban lives that well, can you imagine how well Beet, and the other folks from Durban, who comment here, live.? :mrgreen:

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  16. @BOG: You are 100% correct about the ZAR currently being susceptible to investor sentiment and resulting capital ebbs and flows, but in my opinion this has been amplified, after the financial crisis, as the financial markets bounce along the bottom of a cyclical trough without concrete direction. Unlike the rest of the 1st world, our major banks are still in sound condition (due to prudent capital flow restrictions), our interest rate differentials are very attractive and we still have a positive (albeit small) GDP figure. In my humble opinion these factors will attract long-term investors during the positive growth curve cycle over the next 5 – 10 years. With reference to the rest of Africa, I would suggest acquiring some recent reading material on the economies of Angola, the DRC, Ghana and even Mozambique of late.

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  17. @All, I think you took my post wrongly. I said Bloem is great and that I was pleasantly surprised. My wife, baby and I stayed at Bloemstantia in Dan Pienaar and loved it, so quality is life is great. But quality of life can only be sustained with money, so not sure how Bloemites, what every they are called male their money or maybe it’s old money. I agree with you Bog on the economy, too much borrowing and not enough saving!

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  18. @BOG: Point in case the goverment has just gasseted the new agri min labour rate of R 11-66 per hour now to give you an example of just one industry which is the chicken sector there are nearly 33000 people working here that are affected now the current labour rate of R 7-94 so take one company like Astral foods this increases there labour bill by 113 million a year and this just after they announced they are losing 50 million a month at least and were going to retrench 300 staff and now the likely hood is they will now retrench 1200 staff.

    Now who is the loser here the people and SA as there are a lot of investors who see this and say time to pull my money out for example there is one wine set up in the Cape who has lost a 500 million overseas investment in the last week and there will be more.

    All that happens is as of Dec 2012 there were 690 000 people working in the Agri sector and by July this year 150 000 of them will not have work and will be added to the UIF and criminal Line.

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  19. @Ploegskaar: You are looking at SA(and the world) by using old economic models to explain current phenomena.You are not an exception and this explains why you read in a single edition of a newspaper , 4 different opinions on the same subject. There is confusion and they do not even realize it. The world crossed a rubicon around 2006/7. I have sojourned in some of those countries that you have mentioned and the growth is from such a low base, that it has almost no significance. Also, without almost no benefit to the masses. Almost all investment is in the oil industry. FDI,(Foreign Direct Investment) is around 7% of what it was (in SA) When the Russians lost interest in Angola,, they pronounced themselves in favour of “reform”, but this was nothing but an opportunity to plunder state assets by those around the presidency(The daughter of Dos Santos was recently declared the wealthiest woman in Africa) These people are referred to as the “futungos” Be assured, another revolution is coming. In SA, the population is going to double in the next 15-20 years- most of the additional 49 million, will be unemployed. Very little spontaneous investment is coming into the country. Its coming from countrys with socalled “state capitalism”, mostly China(But watch their bubble burst, because their continued growth relies on the US consumer) or from political investments underwritten by governments which in practice means political investments. And the SA banking system is not quite as healthy as it is made out to be- it is corrupt.@rugbyfan: I hear what you are saying. I was stunned recently to hear that the number of farmers have declined by something like 40000 in just a few years. Inflation was created to manipulate and deceive, but that lie could also last for so long- and we are seeing the end of the line and the consequences. As I said above, we are going to see the population in SA double in the next 15 yrs. Children in need of care in SA, are INCREASING by 25000, PER MONTH!!! Sorry Beet and St Johns that I used your post for an economic discussion, but I assure you, its going to impact on rugby.

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  20. @Queenian: No, that I learnt from my granny. She did it in one sentence-“Remember, the only place where money comes before work, is in the dictionary”

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  21. @Queenian: So the Graeme Festival is on 21 March? I will be driving through to EL that day from Cape Town. It wouldnt be a bad idea to make a stop over in Grahamstown and enjoy some games.Wife-willing of course…hahahaha!

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  22. @BoishaaiPa: No, thankfully, I had to tolerate Sampie just for one year- Ekonomiese Geskiedenis. Thankfully his class was on a Friday afternoon,clashing with my busy schedule which meant I could not make too many of his classes

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  23. @badboy: Ye we know each other must say have not met a Grey boy yet i dont like, i left school in 83 and yourself and Rugbyfan was the idoit who passed me the ball instead of his team mate in 82 when playing for Grey Under 16A against QC 4th team. Much to say we won because of that match fixing at its best final score 8-7 to Queens

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  24. @Playa: I wasnt in Boishaai myself having grown up in the Eastern Cape..I am a Brandwag old boy, but my son was in Boishaai, hence my nickname! I do however know a lot of old Boys of the same era from Boishaai and Gim due to the fact that we studied together at Stellenbosch and played rugby together and against each other. The captain of the ’83 Gim team is in fact a very good friend of mine and the owner of one of the more succesfull wine farms in the Breederiver valley!

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  25. @BoishaaiPa: Oh ok I see. You’ve led a colourful life.Except for the part where you’re an “Ou Matie”…you can only guess that I’m an Ikey man… :mrgreen:

    Much younger than you though :wink:

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  26. @rugbyfan: Sorry bud, but you sound like a fucking brine pumping SAPA minion. Non-viable industry that survived due to government subs pre-94 and cannot export to any country outside Africa due to hygiene issues. Bly binne jou baan pappa, as jy hoender hier wil praat gaan jy op jou moer kry. Jy klink vir by na ‘n regte Supreme Mannetjie.

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  27. @@BOG: Jammer Bog, maar ons het duidelik hier ‘n verskil in uitgangspunt, ervaring en bronne en net die tyd sal leer wie nader aan die waarheid was. Whitey was reg en Raymond het geslaap, miskien moet jy jou Afrikaner-verwysingsraamwerk aanpas, minder op Praag uithang en meer piele vleg in die huidige ekonomie.

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  28. @Ploegskaar: Good one there hope you feel better now actually a beef man seems like some chicken peed you off sometime in your life was just stating what is general econimics not sure what you do but you really have a big chip on your shoulder. SAPA must have done something bad to you some were along the line.

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  29. @Ploegskaar: Miskien moet jy daaraan dink om kommentaar te lewer VOORDAT jy iets drink – Net dalk kan jy sin praat. Ek het baie beslis nie n uitsluitlik Afrikaner perspektief nie. My ma was van Duitse afkms, my vrou en kinders Brits. Inteendeel, vir 35 jaar was ek ter plaatse in verskillende werelddele. As daar dus iemand is wat n “wereldbeskouing “het, dan is dit ek.Jy moet maar ook Martin Meredith se boek gaan lees- selfs Bob Geldoff was beindruk, en net MISKIEN, kan jy iets leer. Te veel SAs staan al so lank met hulle koppe in die sand, dat hulle dink hulle sien blou lug. Wanneer jy iets wat ek se wil weerle, doen dit met FEITE- nie vae veralgemenings nie.Dit kom egter voor dat jy gemaklik voel tussen ander wie ewe veel mislei is as jyself. Dit is n gevaarlike plek om te wees.

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  30. @Ploegskaar: Van Whitey gepraat- miskien moet jy jouself die vraag afvra- waarom het hy R7 miljoen in kontant by hom gehad op Heathrow? Seker inkopies in Parys? Of geld elders te plaas(en ek verkwalik hom geensins nie)

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  31. @rugbyfan: A chip with regards to the poultry industry, yes, but with the beef, lamb and pig boys I have noqualms, although the PRRS regulations that SAPU has pushed for in private may change that. Although our trading division and processing plant predominantly functions on our annual imports of 72000mt, I supplement our needs with weekly beef carcass deliveries from Jan Kemp, Kimberley and Welkom, pigs from Viljoenskroon and Meyerton and lamb from Pofadder and Bredasdorp. Hell, I even support the ostrich farmers with weekly deliveries, but I would honestly rather close doors than buy local poultry.

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  32. @BOG: Ek trek nie jou bronne of ervaring noodwendig in twyfel nie, maar in Alan Greenspan se woorde is die wereldekonomie, waarvan ons deel vorm, ‘n amorfe, vloeibare en onvoorspelbare kriatuur met ‘n wil van sy eie. Daar is nie ‘n reg of verkeerd nie, wel verskeie opinies en moontlike uitkomste, so almal is reg en almal is verkeerd. Dink jy verwys na Christo Wiese se £600000 eskepade en dink kontant besigheid en die gebruik van sg. tax havens is darem ‘n wereldwye gebruik, bes moontlik verfyn deur die vindingryke Grieke en Porras!

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  33. @Ploegskaar: Ek luister nie uitsluitlik na die rooi ligte in my eie kop nie, maar ook na ander gesaghebbendes, oa Tosca Fund waarna ek hierbo verwys het, Na n maandelange studie IN SA, het hulle hul bevindinge vrygestel. Daarin het hulle SA as n “economic wasteland” beskryf in ongeveer 13 jaar(Dit was 2 jaar gelede). Al waarmee ek kon verskil, was die tydsduur van hulle prognose. My beraming was 7 jaar, maw 5 jaar van nou. Greenspan en die Fed het n bubble gehap, en wat hulle ookal doen, sal nie in belang wees van SA nie. Waar jy die beste verskans sal wees teen dit wat kom(LW , die beste, nie totaal vrygestel) is in n land wat groot is, yl bevolk en ryk aan minerale is. Daar is net 2, Australie en Kanada. Di my advies aan my kinders, maar allermins n geweldadige oorbevolkte land vol gewelddadige werkloses. Die skrif is aan die muur- duidelik, maar soos een ou gese het, hy hoop maar hy lees dit verkeerd.

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  34. @BoishaaiPa: Brandwag will have a good team this year they have 9 of last years team back will have a big pack of forwards and are well coached so they should get through the year with some good wins. There first game this year is against Queens which will be a game of Big Pack vs Quick Backs will be interested to see who comes out on tops, Queens will have a young team this year so it will interesting to see if they will be able to handle Brandwags pack.

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  35. @Queenian: One of my old school buddies’s youngest son will most probably be playing for Brandwag as fullback or flyhalf. He was a good little player at primary school and quick as hell…I think he is now in Gr11 but I will try and find out more what is going on over there.

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  36. @BoishaaiPa: I was in Uitenhage last week watching cricket and the Brandwag boys were training on the field behind us and they have some big boys there so i rekon they should be okay.

    The last 5 years Brandwag have been very good always just in or just below the top 20 so i think they should be there or there about.

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  37. @rugbyfan: I dont often get to watch them as I use to. When my brother-in-law’s kids where playing a few years back they werent that bad either. They produced the 1st non-white SA Schools captain in Sean Plaatjies in that team and players like Wylie Human and Drikus Hancke all played together as well…

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  38. Sien uit na die festival en hoop maar die President’s XV kan ietsie oplewer aangesien ek belang daar het. Lekker om julle kommentaar te lees manne :)

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